The Swetland Family Association

 

 

 

 











 

 

 

 

 

Coat of Arms

 

The following information was researched and purchased by Mark W. Swetland for our Family Association.

 

Which one is correct?  Which one is most accurate?  Well, it’s lost in the written and spoken history and mis-history (thus mystery) of the Swetland, Sweetland, Sweatland lineage.  Which one do you like best, and which one have you seen most often to represent your family?  Post your response on the Coat of Arms Poll on the SFA Message Board, click here to jump there.

 

 

 

1a.

 

Swetland

 

This depiction shows a standard frame and scroll set that has been drawn and detailed within for the Swetland family name.  Date of origination unknown.

 

 

1b.

 

Swetland

 

This depiction shows the very same details as shown in the first frame.  This version has been completely hand drawn by a lest skilled artisan and as appears to be a copy of that in the first frame.  Note the “A.D 1340” shown below the scroll.  It appears to be by the same artisan, yet can we determine as the date of the drawing? Or the date of the original conception of the coat of arms?  Or is it simply some initials “A.D.” and a number that had specific meaning to the artisan or the person it may have been drawn for?

 

 

 

1c.

 

 

This historiography was prepared individually for the Swetland surname on November 26, 1973 at the request of Mr. Mark Swetland

 

The coat-of-arms illustrated left was drawn by a heraldic artist based upon information about the Swetland surname and its association with heraldry.  In the language of the ancient heralds, the arms are described as follows:

"Quartered: 1st, or; the letter "S" sa.; 2nd and 3rd, gu.; a dragon rampant vert,: 4th, cheguy or and sa. Charged with a small inner shield vert."

 

The Swetland arms is translated:

Divided into quarters: 1st quarter, gold background; a black initial "S", 2nd and 3rd quarters, red background; a green dragon standing upright; 4th quarter, checkered; alternating squares gold and black.  A small green inner shield placed over all.

 

A dragon is the guardian of riches and knowledge. Seven vivid colors were chosen for use on shields of armor-clad kniahts to easily identify them at a distance.  The heraldic colors gold, silver, purple, blue, green, black, and red were preserved on colorless drawings by dot and line symbols. The Swetland coat-or-arms incorporated green. The color green represents hope, vitality, plenty.

 

Information available indicates that in 1972 there were less than 300 households in the U. S. with the old and distinguished Swetland name. In comparison, some family names represent over 400,000 households in the United States.

 

This report does not represent individual lineage of the Swetland family tree and no genealogical representation is intended or implied.

 

©1973 Halberts

 

1d.

 

 

YOUR   NAME   AND    YOUR    COAT   OF   ARMS             Priceless Gifts From History

 

Until about 1100 A.D. most people in Europe had only one name (This is still true in some primitive countries today). As the population increased it became awkward to live in a village wherein perhaps 1/3 of the males were named John, another sizable percentage named William, and so forth.

And so, to distinguish one John from another a second name was needed. There were four primary sources for these second names. They were: a man's occupa­tion, his location, his father's name or some peculiar characteristic of his. Here are some examples.

 

Occupation: The local house builder, food preparer, grain grinder and suit maker would be named respectively: John Carpenter, John Cook, John Miller, and John Taylor.

 

Location: The John who lived over the hill became known as John Overhill, the one who dwelled near a stream might be dubbed John Brook or perhaps John Atbrook.

 

Patronymical: (father's name): Many of these surnames can be recognized by the termination—son, such as Williamson, Jackson, etc. Some endings used by other countries to indicate "son" are: Armenian's—ian, Dane's and Norwegian's —sen, Finn's—nen, Greek's—pulos, Spaniard's—ez, and Pole's—wiecz . Prefixes denoting "son" are the Welsh— Ap,    the   Scot's    and    Irish-—Mac,    and the    Norman's—Fitz.  The Irish 0' incidentally denotes  grandfather.

Characteristic: An    unusually    small person might be labeled Small, Short, Little or Lytle. A large man might be named Longfellow, Large, Lang, or Long. Many persons having characteristics of a certain animal would be given the animal's name. Examples: a sly person might be named Fox; a good swimmer, Fish; a quiet man, Dove; etc.

 

In addition to needing an extra name for identification, one occupational group found it necessary to go a step further. The fighting man: The fighting man of the Middle Ages wore a metal suit of armor for protection. Since this suit of armor included a helmet that completely covered the head, a knight in full battle dress was unrecognizable. To prevent friend from attacking friend during the heat of battle, it became necessary for each knight to somehow identify himself. Many knights accomplished this by paint­ing colorful patterns on their battle shields. These patterns were also woven into cloth surcoats which were worn over a suit of armor. Thus was born the term, "Coat of Arms."

 

As this practice grew more popular, it became more and more likely that two knights unknown to each other might be using the same insignia. To prevent this, records were kept that granted the right to a particular pattern to a particular knight. His family also shared his right to display these arms. In some instances, these records have been preserved and/or compiled into book form. The records list the family name and an exact description of the "Coat of Arms" granted to that family.

Interest in heraldry is increasing daily. This is especially true among people who have a measure of family pride and who resent attempts of our society to reduce each individual to a series of numbers stored somewhere in a computer. In our matter-of-fact day and age, a "Coat of Arms"is one of the rare devices remaining that can provide an incentive to preserve our heritage. We hope you'll agree that it is much more than just a wall decoration.

 

If you are interested in a more in-depth study of the subject of this paper, may we suggest you contact the genealogical department of any fair-sized public library. We especially recommend the "Dictionary of American Family Names" published by Harper & Row and also "The Surnames of Scotland" available from the New York Public Library as excellent sources on the meaning of surnames.

 

Nancy L.  Halbert

 

 

1e.

 

The Coat of Arms you see on the top of each web page here and on our newsletter is a photograph of a Coat of Arms that Elmer Dana Swetland had order in the 1970’s, (shown here).  The name of the book that came with it is “The Family Heritage Book”, Published in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  You may have ordered/received a similar mailing as well with brief information on Swetland/Sweetland/Sweatland and a lot of general information of families in early America.  As you can see this reflects the same coat of arms as shown in the previous section as ordered by Mark W. Swetland and published by Halberts © 1973.  Additionally, it reflects the depictions of the coat of arms shown in the early few frames.

 

 

 

2a.

 

 

 

2b.

 

 

 

2c.

 

Sweetland

 

Courtesy of Family-crests.com

 

Record Number 16661

 

Sweetland

 

Exmouth, Devon, granted 5 August 1808

 

Arms: Argent on a mount vert an orange tree fucted proper, on a chief embattled gules three roses of the field, barbed and seeded of the third quartering, or, on a bend azure, cotised gules between the two escallops of the second, a crescent argent enclosed by two suns in splendour, for Bright.

 

Crest: A cubit arm couped in armour proper garnished or, in the gauntlet two stalks of wheat bladed and eared, and a vine branch fructed also proper.

 

 

 

3a.

 

Swetland

 

Courtesy of Family-crests.com

 

Record Number 16667

 

Swetland

 

Exmouth, Devon, granted 5 August 1808

 

Arms: Argent on a mount vert an orange tree fucted proper, on a chief embattled gules three roses of the field, barbed and seeded of the third quartering, or, on a bend azure, cotised gules between the two escallops of the second, a crescent argent enclosed by two suns in splendour, for Bright.

 

Crest: A cubit arm couped in armour proper garnished or, in the gauntlet two stalks of wheat bladed and eared, and a vine branch fructed also proper.

 

 

3b.

 

Swetland

 

Courtesy of Family-crests.com

 

Record Number 16662

 

Sweetland

 

Granted 5 August 1808 to David Sweetland, Esq., an officer in the Commissary Department, Gibraltar.

 

Arms: Ermine, on a rock an orange tree fructed proper on a chief embattled gules three roses argent barbed and seeded also proper.

 

Crest: A cubit arm couped in armour proper garnished or, in the gauntlet a rose argent barbed and seeded proper.

 

 

 



 

Home  Return to Top

Thank you for Stopping by the Swetland Family Association Website
This Page Last Updated July 16, 2008
Send an e-mail to
Jamie R. Swetland

www.swetland.org

SFA ©2004-2010